Updates to the Church Fathers page in the Resource section

Early Church MosaicAfter someone asked me some questions on Twitter, I decided to finally update the Church Fathers page in the Resource section here at the site, which I should have done long ago. Then I could have said, Why, here you go, all conveniently listed for you. But I hadn’t updated the page in a couple of years so… It’s updated now and largely re-written. Still by no means an exhaustive list, but there are more titles now and a link or two also updated/edited. I also added some videos and some Logos/Verbum titles and collections to the list.

Still not exhaustive by any means, but should be useful and helpful to those starting out in the study of the Early Church and Church Fathers. Cheers! And peace be with you.

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Warnings that fell mostly on deaf ears

Got two more books in the mail: “The Legacy of Malthus: The Social Costs of the New Scientific Racism” by Allan Chase, and “The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy” by Enrique T. Rueda. My reading list keeps growing and growing.

legacyofmalthus_allanchase hnetwork_rueda

The Legacy of Malthus: The Social Costs of the New Scientific Racism

review of The Legacy of Malthus on Kirkus Reviews, verbatim in the one long paragraph as it appears online:

“It is Allan Chase’s thesis that the legacy of the Industrial Revolution has been to elevate old-fashioned “”gut racism”” into the pseudoscience of eugenics. From Spencer and Malthus and Galton through Shockley, Jensen, and Herrnstein, an elite of demented aristocrats, benighted liberals, and pompous academicians has perpetuated the belief that bad genes cause pauperism, poor brains, pellagra, or prostitution. The remedy: sterilize the unfit and render not one cent to charity. Chase’s monumental demolition project takes the villains in turn, quotes them at length, and then assails them with facts as they were known then or appear now. The result is a huge tome, essentially successful, but burdened with excessive repetition and the kind of righteous prose Chase so often demonstrates in The Enemy. (Chief culprits are often referred to by their full Christian names, accompanied by a rich epithet; if a villain is related by blood, marriage, or friendship to some other celebrity, this too is mentioned, leaving the reader to wonder whether he means guilt by association or a refutation of genetic linkage!) But the tide of information and sanity is clearly on Chase’s side. His excellent presentation of the counterarguments and population studies that give the lie to the Jensenites in the IQ controversy as well as his final chapters on recent studies of genetic/environmental interaction at the cellular level win the day. His “”modest proposal”” that the state of Mississippi be chosen for all-out social and public health programs to see what several generations of good nutrition, preventive health measures, enrichment programs, and environmental health reduction would do to medical and psychological measurements is challenging. He is also to be congratulated for naming names–like Margaret Sanger, William McDougall, and other distinguished figures who paid homage to the eugenics cant and encouraged, directly or indirectly, Immigration Restriction Laws, anti-Semitism, and the Holocaust. With some cutting and much less sermonizing, this very fine and useful book would have been a gem.” (Used with permission from Kirkus Reviews Online.)

The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy

Here’s an article by Connie Marshner, the wife of Dr. William Marshner, one of the founders of Christendom College: We Told You So — The Catholic Homosexual Network 20 Years Later. This same article appears in the Question and Answer section on EWTN. Below are a few paragraphs quoted. In light of recent events it seems worth re-reading, or, as in my case, reading for the first time. There is so much I didn’t know. Better late than never, I guess.

In the book, Fr. Rueda detailed — with meticulous footnotes — what, already then, was the growing network of “support groups,” counseling referrals, newsletters, and organizations of homosexuals and pro-homosexuals in the churches of the United States, including the Catholic Church. The network was particularly effective within the Catholic Church: at one point in the late ’70s, a key staffer at the Office of Public Affairs and Information of the U. S. Catholic Conference/National Conference of Catholic Bishops was a leader of the Washington, D.C., homosexual movement as well as president of Dignity, the pressure group which seeks to force the Catholic Church to relate to homosexuals according to the tenets of the homosexual ideology.

The name of the fair city of Boston appears frequently in Fr. Rueda’s pages, giving it the dubious distinction of being the birthplace of NAMBLA, the North American Man/Boy Love Association (an interesting coincidence in light of subsequent developments). Also interesting to note is that one Fr. Paul Shanley attended the NAMBLA convention in Boston, supposedly on behalf of the then-Cardinal Archbishop, Medeiros.

In the early days of “gay liberation,” 1972, a National Coalition of Gay Organizations adopted a “Gay Rights Platform.” This list of demands included one to repeal all laws governing the age of sexual consent — a matter of some obvious concern to pederasts.

“Homosexuality is no sicker than heterosexuality,” proclaimed the Third Number of the NAMBLA Journal. “What is sick is society’s efforts to supress [sic] and persecute it.”

In those days, every type of sexual activity was considered equally deserving of “liberation.” As pederast theoretician David Thorstad proclaimed it in the pages of Boston’s Gay Community News in January, 1979: “We should present ourselves not merely as defenders of our own personal rights to privacy and sexual expression, but as the champions of the right of all persons — regardless of age — to engage in the sexuality of their choice. We must recognize homosexual behavior for what it is — a natural potential of the human animal.”

By 1998, Thorstad was blasting the gay movement because it had “retreated from its vision of sexual liberation, in favor of integration and assimilation into existing social and political structures … increasingly sought to marginalize even demonize cross-generational love.”

Translation: The tacticians who won the internal battles, and therefore prevailed, realized that “We are everywhere” was a slogan that could sell. “Man/boy love” wouldn’t sell. Call it an “incremental” strategy, if you will.

It is going to be a long, long struggle to re-establish in mainstream Catholic culture an understanding and acceptance of what the Catechism teaches on homosexual acts — namely, that they are intrinsically disordered, and under no circumstances can be approved, while at the same time men and women who have homosexual tendencies must be accepted with respect, compassion and sensitivity.

From Connie Marshner’s article which is a good read in its entirety. Link to the PDF.

Will be returning to reading Laudato Si soon. Have been spending a lot of time on Twitter instead of blogging or reading, ever since the Planned Parenthood “Human Capital” videos were posted. If you haven’t seen them yet, I highly recommend that you do, but not right before you sit down to dinner or right after you eat. Not unless you have a really strong stomach or as cold and callous as the PP employees munching away while talking about–no, I’ll just let you see it for yourself.


*Permission to quote the Kirkus review: “However, you may occasionally distribute a copy or a portion of a review from the Website in electronic or non-electronic form, including, without limitation, on weblogs, newsgroups, Twitter or other social media, without charge, if you include all copyright and other proprietary rights notices in the same form in which the notices appear in the Service and the phrase ‘Used with permission from Kirkus Reviews Online.'”

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Those videos are hard to watch

Mother of the Light of the world, pray for us.

Mother of the Light of the world, pray for us.

I have not watched the videos all the way through. You know the videos I’m talking about. Those videos. I have not watched them all the way through because they make me ill. They make me want to throw up and the images haunt me. I go to sleep and I wake up in a cold sweat, still seeing them before my eyes.

Bad enough that I have been researching for the last couple of years the Holocaust and the World Wars. Bad enough that I have been watching the last couple of weeks many documentaries about these subjects and have seen things I wish I had never seen, things I wish had never happened. Bad enough I have been reading about eugenics and “scientific racism” and the incredible and preposterous cruel things man can do to his fellow man in the name of the “greater good” or “science”. Bad enough, all of that.

But something very like the Holocaust is happening now, and has been happening right under our noses since 1973 when we had the audacity to make legal to do to humans what we consider monstrously inhumane to do to wild animals. And do not misunderstand me: I care about wild animals and would not think of trying to harm one unless I had to protect myself or someone else. But I love my fellow man even more and certainly do not want to cause any harm to any man, woman, or child, unless, likewise, in defense of myself or someone else.

I find the chopping up of tiny babies to be sickening, but not less sickening than killing them in the first place. ALL of it must stop. There is no reason to take an innocent human life, ever. To directly and deliberately take an innocent human life is always and everywhere evil. There is no way around it. There is no name you can give it to justify it. There is no way to cover it with ridiculous words and excuses, no way to hide from the truth of what it really is.

There is no way we can pretend that we do not know what we are doing, what we are permitting, what we are approving and condoning, what we are selling, what we are making legal and profitable.

In the end, what does it profit you if you make all the money in the world and drive the fanciest car you can buy and wear the best clothes and drink the best wine, when you have to hack tiny human babies to pieces to do it? How much money do you make for each of the lives you take, to make it worth it to you to take them? How many pieces of silver do you get for selling your own soul?


The Gospel of Life by Pope Saint John Paul II. Here he quotes Vatican II, Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World, Gaudium et Spes (easier to read at EWTN), 27:

“The Second Vatican Council, in a passage which retains all its relevance today, forcefully condemned a number of crimes and attacks against human life. Thirty years later, taking up the words of the Council and with the same forcefulness I repeat that condemnation in the name of the whole Church, certain that I am interpreting the genuine sentiment of every upright conscience: ‘Whatever is opposed to life itself, such as any type of murder, genocide, abortion, euthanasia, or wilful self-destruction, whatever violates the integrity of the human person, such as mutilation, torments inflicted on body or mind, attempts to coerce the will itself; whatever insults human dignity, such as subhuman living conditions, arbitrary imprisonment, deportation, slavery, prostitution, the selling of women and children; as well as disgraceful working conditions, where people are treated as mere instruments of gain rather than as free and responsible persons; all these things and others like them are infamies indeed. They poison human society, and they do more harm to those who practise them than to those who suffer from the injury. Moreover, they are a supreme dishonour to the Creator’.”

From the Gospel of Life, 40 and 41:

  1. The sacredness of life gives rise to its inviolability, written from the beginning in man’s heart, in his conscience. The question: “What have you done?” (Gen 4:10), which God addresses to Cain after he has killed his brother Abel, interprets the experience of every person: in the depths of his conscience, man is always reminded of the inviolability of life-his own life and that of others-as something which does not belong to him, because it is the property and gift of God the Creator and Father.

The commandment regarding the inviolability of human life reverberates at the heart of the “ten words” in the covenant of Sinai (cf. Ex 34:28). In the first place that commandment prohibits murder: “You shall not kill” (Ex 20:13); “do not slay the innocent and righteous” (Ex 23:7). But, as is brought out in Israel’s later legislation, it also prohibits all personal injury inflicted on another (cf. Ex 21:12-27). Of course we must recognize that in the Old Testament this sense of the value of life, though already quite marked, does not yet reach the refinement found in the Sermon on the Mount. This is apparent in some aspects of the current penal legislation, which provided for severe forms of corporal punishment and even the death penalty. But the overall message, which the New Testament will bring to perfection, is a forceful appeal for respect for the inviolability of physical life and the integrity of the person. It culminates in the positive commandment which obliges us to be responsible for our neighbour as for ourselves: “You shall love your neighbour as yourself” (Lev 19:18).

  1. The commandment “You shall not kill”, included and more fully expressed in the positive command of love for one’s neighbour, is reaffirmed in all its force by the Lord Jesus. To the rich young man who asks him: “Teacher, what good deed must I do, to have eternal life?”, Jesus replies: “If you would enter life, keep the commandments” (Mt 19:16,17). And he quotes, as the first of these: “You shall not kill” (Mt 19:18). In the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus demands from his disciples a righteousness which surpasses that of the Scribes and Pharisees, also with regard to respect for life: “You have heard that it was said to the men of old, “You shall not kill; and whoever kills shall be liable to judgment’. But I say to you that every one who is angry with his brother shall be liable to judgment” (Mt 5:21-22).

By his words and actions Jesus further unveils the positive requirements of the commandment regarding the inviolability of life. These requirements were already present in the Old Testament, where legislation dealt with protecting and defending life when it was weak and threatened: in the case of foreigners, widows, orphans, the sick and the poor in general, including children in the womb (cf. Ex 21:22; 22:20-26). With Jesus these positive requirements assume new force and urgency, and are revealed in all their breadth and depth: they range from caring for the life of one’s brother (whether a blood brother, someone belonging to the same people, or a foreigner living in the land of Israel) to showing concern for the stranger, even to the point of loving one’s enemy.

A stranger is no longer a stranger for the person who mustbecome a neighbour to someone in need, to the point of accepting responsibility for his life, as the parable of the Good Samaritan shows so clearly (cf. Lk 10:25-37). Even an enemy ceases to be an enemy for the person who is obliged to love him (cf. Mt 5:38-48; Lk 6:27-35), to “do good” to him (cf. Lk 6:27, 33, 35) and to respond to his immediate needs promptly and with no expectation of repayment (cf. Lk 6:34-35). The height of this love is to pray for one’s enemy. By so doing we achieve harmony with the providential love of God: “But I say to you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, so that you may be children of your Father who is in heaven; for he makes his sun rise on the evil and on the good and sends rain on the just and on the unjust” (Mt 5:44-45; cf. Lk 6:28, 35).

Thus the deepest element of God’s commandment to protect human life is the requirement to show reverence and love for every person and the life of every person. This is the teaching which the Apostle Paul, echoing the words of Jesus, address- es to the Christians in Rome: “The commandments, ?You shall not commit adultery, You shall not kill, You shall not steal, You shall not covet’, and any other commandment, are summed up in this sentence, ?You shall love your neighbour as yourself’. Love does no wrong to a neighbour; therefore love is the fulfilling of the law” (Rom 13:9-10).

When I ran a search in the Gospel of Life for the word “murder”, I got 29 hits. I highly recommend reading it in full. I’ve read it many times, usually once a year or every two years, along with the Splendor of Truth. More than anything else I have ever read, outside of Scripture, these two encyclicals changed my life (and just so you know, John Paul II’s encyclicals are filled with Scripture references). They woke me up. I went from being someone who was nominally pro-life to someone who was pro-life actively, outspokenly, finding out more, sharing what I had found, voting for pro-life laws, supporting pro-life candidates, no longer supporting candidates who are not pro-life. Really, if you do not stand for life, then what in God’s name do you stand for?

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Posts will resume after a brief interlude

I’ll get back to reading and posting about Laudato Si soon, but I’m taking a brief break while I work on a novel for Camp NaNoWriMo. Right now I’m over 17,000 words in and am finding it difficult to think of anything else. But soon I will resume reading the encyclical and putting down some more thoughts about it. Plenty of other people have said plenty about it, as I am sure you are aware. Some of them even have something worthwhile to say. While I’m away, working on the novel, I leave you with this worthwhile and short video commentary and summary by Al Kresta. (If you haven’t ever caught his show on Catholic radio, I highly recommend that you check it out.)

Published on Jul 9, 2015: While specific scientific and economic points can be debated, since they are prudential judgements of the pope, the doctrine surrounding them are truths of faith and are binding on the consciences of believers. So why don’t we focus on those aspect of the encyclical, since they really aren’t controversial at all?”

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Wake up, wise up, and rise up, Church

mgok_reillyYes, I saw the ruling. I wasn’t surprised by it, saw it coming. This has been in the works for a long time. Many years. Decades, even. From the 60’s onward (though, of course, it began long before then) this has been in the works. Read School of Darkness (which doesn’t mention homosexuality but reveals the marxist machine behind many movements). Read Making Gay Okay: How Rationalizing Homosexual Behavior Is Changing Everything. Read After the Ball: How America Will Conquer Its Fear and Hatred of Gays in the 90’s (if you can find a used copy for a reasonable price or in a library). Read Rules for Radicals. Read about Cultural Marxism and the Frankfurt School (see related videos also). Listen to Psychology: Friend or Foe (CD or MP3) or read We Overcame Their Tradition, We Overcame Their Faith by Dr. William Coulson. Also see video below.

All of these things are interconnected. All of these movements and trends have led us to where we are now. To combat our enemy, we must know our enemy. We have been complacent or ignorant or asleep for TOO LONG. Wake up, wise up, and RISE UP, Church, NOW.

Psychologist Dr. William Coulson explains what he and fellow psychologist Carl Rogers did to Catholic religious houses, and more, in the 60’s. What they needed was holiness and spiritual training and discipline. What they got was “self-esteem” and not an authentic understanding of the human person as taught by the Church. What a mess. And look where we are today: vocations dropped to almost nothing in those houses that opted for false spirituality; vocations booming in houses that kept or returned to authentic Catholic spirituality and RELIGION. Yes, the R word. RELIGION: That by which we are bound in covenant to and united with God, and without which we have a vague, amorphous and all too often imaginary relationship without any basis at all in reality.

Do I feel strongly about this? I do, but this is not about feelings or opinions or desires or wishes. This is about reality, about the world of the real versus the world of really stupid wishful thinking. The world IS, God IS, and all the playing with words that humans can do will never change reality. Contrary to all the new age nonsense so many have imbibed, we do NOT make our own reality. Reality is a given and we receive it and deal with it, or we can butt our heads against it which won’t hurt reality but can break our hard little heads. Looking around me, I see a lot of people who prefer to bash their own heads against the brick wall of reality instead of learning to see the world as it really is.

Divine Mercy

Jesus, we trust in You!

But I also see many people who are more spiritually aware than that. We are praying for those who are obstinate and who are determined to harm themselves and others. We are praying for those who insist on living in a way that may bring some sort of temporary pleasure but can never bring lasting happiness. And can certainly never bring eternal joy.

By the way, once one accepts reality as it is (which does not mean giving in to sin or giving in to despair), the brick wall aspect of it drops away and what is revealed is beautiful beyond words. Is there terror in the world, and sin, and horror, and death? Yes. But there is also joy and love and friendship and family and creativeness and intellect and spirit and heart and music and so many things I can’t even think of without feeling overwhelmed by tears at the beauty of it all. The world would be such a different place if people gave themselves over to real Love. And the One Who is Love Itself.

For the sake of His Sorrowful Passion, have mercy on us and on the whole world. Amen!

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